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Guidance » College-Bound Athletes

College-Bound Athletes

College-Bound Athletes

"Always do the best you can." 
 
 
College-bound student-athletes preparing to enroll in a Division I or Division II school need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center to ensure they have met amateurism standards and are academically prepared for college coursework.
  

College Sports: A Team Effort

The transition from high school to college sports is no small leap. Just like choosing a college, there are many factors that a student athlete must consider when deciding on a sports program and a coach. In addition, there are policies and procedures that a student must follow in order to be eligible for college athletics.

Keep the "Student" in Student-Athlete

The first thing that every student athlete needs to remember, before they dream of making the big play in college, is that they are attending a college for an education first not to play sports. In our world of multimillion dollar athletes, product endorsement, and instant gratification, this notion does not get as much attention as it should, but lets take a hard look at the reality of the situation. Very few of the best high school athletes will receive scholarships to play sports in college, and there are a limited number of scholarships that colleges can offer. Of course there are additional opportunities at the Division I-AA and II levels for partial scholarships but the competition for these awards is also fierce. The good news is that there are many more scholarships available for academics then there are for sports and colleges recruit good students just as sports programs pursue blue chippers. Allow yourself the freedom of being able to select one of many colleges by earning the best grades you can.

A Team Effort

Selecting a college is a difficult decision. Add to that the complications of having to decide where you would like to continue your athletic career and the situation can appear impossible. The good news is that you have the people around you that will help you make these decisions; your parents, coaches, and school counselor. A great way to start this process is by arranging a meeting with all involved. Everyone should be on the same page so that you are aware of your strengths and limitations and that they know your career, educational, and athletic goals. This process can be intimidating for a high school student, but with the support of the people around you the experience can be exciting and rewarding.